Thursday, March 19, 2015

Some Late Night Reading -- March 19, 2015

I'm heading to bed; it's been a long day -- actually I will head to bed after I finish an article on Birkenstock footwear in this week's issue of The New Yorker. But a reader sent me this article -- which I have not read yet -- but looks interesting. Based on the title of the article, it suggests some of the same things I've been thinking about with regard to the Bakken: again, remember, the Bakken's reserves exceed those of the Gulf of Mexico.

I'll come back to this article tomorrow, but for those in earlier time zones or those who are night owls, enjoy: http://www.oilandgasinvestor.com/bakken-not-beaten-787521.

Halcon's "Fort Berthold" Wells In Eagle Nest Oil Field

Permits
November 30, 2018
35718,
35717,
35716,
35542,
35541,
35540,
35539,
35513,
35512,
35511,
35510,
35509,
35508,
35493,
35492,
35491,
35490,
35489,
35488,
35487,
34966,
34965,
34964,
34963,
34962,
34961,
34889,
34888,
34887,
34529,
34528,
33594,
33125,
33124,
32613,
32612,
32611,
32610,
32609,
32608,
32606,
32580,
32579,
32506,
32505,
32504,
32503,
32431,
32411, loc,
32410, loc,
32409, loc,
32233,
32232,
32158,
32157,
32156,
31995,
31994,
31890,
31778,
31777,
31776,
31775,
31774,
31697,
31464,
31463,
31462,
31458,
31457,
31456,
31455,
31454,
31189,
31188, 3,752, Bruin, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-8H, t4/16; cum 390K 8/18;
31161,

31156, 1,450, Bruin, Fort Berthold 148-95-13A-24-8H, t10/17; cum 106K 8/18;
31155, 1,572, Bruin, Fort Berthold 148-95-13A-24-7H, t10/17; cum 116K 8/18;
31154, 741, Bruin, Fort Berthold 148-95-13A-24-6H, t11/17; cum 122K 8/18;
31085,
31084,
31083,
31082,
31081,
31080,
31079,
31078,
31077,
31076,

30785,
30784,
30783,
30680,
30779,
30559, 943, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-13H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 109K 8/18;
30558, 1,711, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-12H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 141K 8/18;
30557, SI/NC, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-11H, Eagle Nest,
30556, 1,498, vHRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-10H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 175K 8/18;
30555, 2,437, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-2H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 155K 8/18; 
30564, 2,695, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-10H, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 203K 8/18; jump in production;
30545,
30544,
30543,
30542,
30541,
30269, 1,716, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-13H, Eagle Nest, t7/15; cum 312K 8/18;
30268, 954, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-12H, Eagle Nest, t7/15; cum 223K 8/18;
30267, PNC, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-11H, Eagle Nest,
30248,
30247,
30246,
30245,
30244,
30243,
30242,
30241,
29849,
29848,
29847,
29572,
29571,
29137,
29136,
29135,
29134,
28693,
28692,
28691,
28629,
28628,
28298,
28297,
28296,
28281, 2,606, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C-8-7H, Eagle Nest, t6/15; cum 274K 8/18;
28280, 2,616, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C-8-6H, Eagle Nest, t6/15; cum 253K 8/18;
27646, 2,511, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-96-26A-35-14H, Eagle Nest, t2/15; cum 270K 8/18;
27460, 2,056, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-3H, Eagle Nest, t12/14; cum 256K 8/18;
27459, 1,789, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-8TFH, Eagle Nest, t1/15; cum 251K 8/18;
27458, 1,879, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-3543H, Eagle Nest, t12/14; cum 208K 8/18;
27457, 1,870, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-9TFH, Eagle Nest, t1/15; cum 292K 8/18;
27456, 3,190, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-3H, Eagle Nest, t11/14; cum 324K 8/18;
27435, 3,397, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-5H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 188K 8/18;
27434, 2,738, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-9TFH, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 186K 8/18;
27433, 3,039, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-4H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 170K 8/18;
27432, 3,416, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-18TFH, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 239K 8/18;
27431, 3,163, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-3H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 225K 8/18;
27417, 2,558, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-3H, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 218K 8/18;
27416, 1,672, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-4H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 222K 8/18;
27415, 3,158, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-5H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 276K 8/18;
27414, 2,712, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-6H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 250K 8/18;
27412, 3,745, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-7H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 233K 8/18;
27280, 2,433, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-30B-31-5H, t8/14; cum 159K 1/5;
27279, 2.946, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-19C-18-5H, t8/14; cum 117K 1/15;
27278, 3,715, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-30B-31-4H, t8/14; cum 171K 1/15;
27277, 2,128, HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-19C-18-4H, t8/14; cum 97K 1/15;
27127, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23D-14-7H,
27126, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26A-35-10H,
27125, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23D-14-6H,
27045, 2,135, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-6H, t5/14; cum 114K 1/15;
26323, 3,138, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-22C-15-9H, t4/14; cum 164K 1/15;
26322, 3,317, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-27B-34-8H, t4/14; cum 155K 1/15;
25989, 2,338, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-4H, t6/14; cum 75K 1/15;
25988, 2,045, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-5H, t6/14; cum 99K 1/15;
25557, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-29A-32-9TFH,
25556, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-29A-32-8TF
25534, 2,529, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-94-33C-28-3H, t9/14; cum 92K 1/15;
25506, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-25A-36-3H,
25505, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-25A-36-4H,
25504, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-25A-36-5H,
25502, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C_8-5H,
25210, 2,789, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-22C-15-5h, t4/14; cum 168K 1/15;
25209, 3,719, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-27B-34-5H, t4/14; cum 169K 1/15;
25208, 2,149, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-22C-15-4H, t4/14; cum 112K 1/15;
25207, 2,219, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-27B-34-4H, t5/14; cum 87K 1/15;
24418, 2,054, cum 302K 8/18;
24417, 2,174, cum 274K 8/18;
24310, 2,132, cum 302K 8/18;
24307, 896, cum 1172K 8/18;
24306, 1,727, cum 250K 8/18;
24299, 1,687, cum 178K 5/16;
24298, 1,615, cum 116K 5/16;
24297, 1,967, cum 173K 5/16;
23124, 2,265, cum 266K 5/16;
23123, 2,075, cum 263K 5/16;
22983, 1,464, cum 245K 5/16;
22981, 2,396, cum 227K 5/16;
22980, 3,077, cum 226K 5/16;
22979, 1,583, cum 157K 5/16;
22562, 822, cum 183K 5/16;
22561, 991, cum 143K 5/16;
22560, 846, cum 190K 5/16;
22504, PNA,
22503, 3,244, cum --
22301, conf,
22300, conf,
22299, 615, cum 172K 5/16;
22298, 1,095, cum 167K 5/16;
21963, 4,447, cum 268K 5/16;
21080, 958, cum 356K 8/18;
21079, 1,218, cum 213K 5/16;
21066, 1,347, cum 316K 8/18;
20919, 1,547, cum 414K 8/18;
20918, 607, cum 133K 5/16;
20871, 239, cum 236K 5/16;
20866, 3,236, cum 352K 8/18;
20252, 1,078, cum 113K 5/16;
20173, 836, cum 174K 5/16;
20172, 1,260, cum 155K 5/16;
19976, 1,047, cum 217K 8/18;
18969, 802, cum 235K 5/16;
18968, 875, cum 242K 5/16;
18367, 933, cum 224K 5/16;
18094, 1,323, cum 303K 8/18;
  
Original Post
Data Below Will Not Be Updated
 
Halcon had permits for 23 "Fort Berthold" wells in 2013 in Eagle Nest oil field, Dunn County:
  • 27280, 2,433, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-30B-31-5H, t8/14; cum 159K 1/5;
  • 27279, 2.946, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-19C-18-5H, t8/14; cum 117K 1/15;
  • 27278, 3,715, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-30B-31-4H, t8/14; cum 171K 1/15;
  • 27277, 2,128, vHRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-19C-18-4H, t8/14; cum 97K 1/15;
  • 27127, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23D-14-7H,
  • 27126, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26A-35-10H,
  • 27125, conf, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23D-14-6H,
  • 27045, 2,135, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-6H, t5/14; cum 114K 1/15;
  • 26323, 3,138, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-22C-15-9H, t4/14; cum 164K 1/15;
  • 26322, 3,317, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-27B-34-8H, t4/14; cum 155K 1/15;
  • 25989, 2,338, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-4H, t6/14; cum 75K 1/15;
  • 25988, 2,045, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-20C-21-5H, t6/14; cum 99K 1/15;
  • 25557, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-29A-32-9TFH,
  • 25556, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-29A-32-8TFH,
  • 25534, 2,529, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-94-33C-28-3H, t9/14; cum 92K 1/15;
  • 25506, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-25A-36-3H, 
  • 25505, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-25A-36-4H,
  • 25504, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-25A-36-5H, 
  • 25502, conf, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C_8-5H,
  • 25210, 2,789, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-22C-15-5h, t4/14; cum 168K 1/15;
  • 25209, 3,719, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-27B-34-5H, t4/14; cum 169K 1/15;
  • 25208, 2,149, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold 148-95-22C-15-4H, t4/14; cum 112K 1/15;
  • 25207, 2,219, Bruin/HRC/G3 Operating, Fort Berthold148-95-27B-34-4H, t5/14; cum 87K 1/15;
*************************************

Halcon had permits for 47 "Fort Berthold" wells in 2014. The wells were in four different oil fields, in two counties, Dunn County and McKenzie County.

These are the twenty-one (21) Halcon "Fort Berthold" permits/wells in Eagle Nest oil field, Dunn County for 2014 only:
  • 30269, 1,716, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-13H, Eagle Nest, t7/15; cum 312K 8/18;
  • 30268, 954, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-12H, Eagle Nest, t7/15; cum 223K 8/18;
  • 30267, PNC, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17D-8-11H, Eagle Nest,
  • 28281, 2,606, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C-8-7H, Eagle Nest, t6/15; cum 274K 8/18;
  • 28280, 2,616, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-94-17C-8-6H, Eagle Nest, t6/15; cum 253K 8/18;
  • 27646, 2,511, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-96-26A-35-14H, Eagle Nest, t2/15; cum 270K 8/18;
  • 27460, 2,056, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-3H, Eagle Nest, t12/14; cum 256K 8/18;
  • 27459, 1,789, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-8TFH, Eagle Nest, t1/15; cum 251K 8/18;
  • 27458, 1,879, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-3543H, Eagle Nest, t12/14; cum 208K 8/18;
  • 27457, 1,870, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-9TFH, Eagle Nest, t1/15; cum 292K 8/18;
  • 27456, 3,190, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26B-35-3H, Eagle Nest, t11/14; cum 324K 8/18;
  • 27435, 3,397, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-5H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 188K 8/18;
  • 27434, 2,738, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-9TFH, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 186K 8/18;
  • 27433, 3,039, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-4H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 170K 8/18;
  • 27432, 3,416, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-18TFH, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 239K 8/18;
  • 27431, 3,163, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-3H, Eagle Nest, t6/16; cum 225K 8/18;
  • 27417, 2,558, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-3H, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 218K 8/18;
  • 27416, 1,672, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-4H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 222K 8/18;
  • 27415, 3,158, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-5H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 276K 8/18;
  • 27414, 2,712, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-6H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 250K 8/18;
  • 27412, 3,745, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-25B-36-7H, Eagle Nest, t4/16; cum 233K 8/18;
*******************************************

As of March 19, 2015, there are the six (6) Halcon "Fort Berthold" permits/wells in Eagle Nest oil field, Dunn County for 2015:
  • 30564, 2,695, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-23C-14-10H, Eagle Nest, t5/16; cum 203K 8/18; jump in production;
  • 30559, 943, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-13H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 109K 8/18;
  • 30558, 1,711, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-12H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 141K 8/18;
  • 30557, SI/NC, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-11H, Eagle Nest,
  • 30556, 1,498, vHRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-10H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 175K 8/18;
  • 30555, 2,437, Bruin/HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-13B-24-2H, Eagle Nest, t12/17; cum 155K 8/18;

Huge Halcon Three Forks Well In Eagle Nest Oil Field -- March 19, 2015

One (1) producing well completed:
  • 21963, 4,447, HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26A-35-2H, Eagle Nest, Three Forks, originally 1280-acre spacing; changed to 4 sections, no geology report yet to confirm IP; no fracking report; t3/15; cum -- 
This is not a record IP, but it's a huge, huge well. A huge shout-out to the geologists and the roughnecks. 

Minerals Tracking Site Looking For Folks Willing To Beta-Test The Site -- March 19, 2015

www.myminerals.com is looking for some folks with minerals to test out their new site. I don't have any minerals, but I have gone to the site and given them my e-mail address and county where I have (fantasy) mineral rights, to help them test their site.

The individuals at myminerals.com are hoping to get a number of folks interested to test the new site. If I understand them correctly, once they have a number of folks interested, they will then poll the "beta testers" to see what functionality (or functionalities) those early testers are most interested in.

I will be "playing" with fantasy minerals to help them develop their site. One of the things I hope to gain from this: apparently their maps load more quickly than Bing or Google maps. Long-time readers might remember a Bakken mapping service that was absolutely incredible, but it was not up very long due to personal health reasons involving the website designer. There are other map sites, none of which I use any more, and to the best of my knowledge, they only "map"; they don't help mineral owners track "their" wells with regard to production. 

The second thing I would be interested in: if the myminerals.com has an "app" that can be accessed through the Apple app store or similar store at an Android/Google site. 

If the site works, I hope they break down production by oil, natural gas, and other produced products.

I don't have any personal relationship with the developers of myminerals.com but they have been in touch with me over the past few months and everything seems to be "on the up and up," as they say. I am not being reimbursed anything for this "shout-out." I just like to see the where these products might take us.

*********************************
Origami

Our 8-y/o granddaughter loves origami -- Japanese paper folding. She really seems to have a natural talent. She goes on-line, generally to Facebook, to find origami challenges. It was ironic, then, that this week's issue of The New Yorker had the directions for making a rose using a square of pink paper.

Like many examples of how to fold something, in the Japanese style, a step or two is missing, in this case, between step 3 and step 4. 

See if you can fill in the necessary steps:


March Madness -- March 19, 2015

The AP/Bakken.com is reporting:
WILLISTON, N.D. — An international real estate company is pressing officials in North Dakota’s Williams County make a decision on approving a proposed $500 million development on the outskirts of Williston.
Swiss-based Stropiq has asked the Williams County Commission to force its planning and zoning committee to make a recommendation on Williston Crossing. The project would include 1 million square feet of space for retail, entertainment, office, hotel and housing development.
Developers have billed it as a regional destination with a water park and other attractions that would draw people from southern Canada, eastern Montana and surrounding areas in North Dakota.
“If the Williams County Commission ultimately denies this project, we have nothing further to discuss with retailers for the foreseeable future,” Olin said. “If the Commission approves the project, we will be able to move forward with them in May and invest in finding solutions to the structural issues raised. Therefore time is of the essence for us.”
*************************
Ruined Brackets

And this is why it's called March Madness: at least 96% of all folks submitting brackets to Yahoo!Sports are now "out of it" -- at least as far as a perfect bracket is concerned: third-seeded Iowa State lost to 14-ranked University of Alabama-Birmingham.

For the few who might have had that right, surely they didn't luck out twice in a row: third-seeded Baylor lost to 14-ranked Georgia State.

And if that's not enough, 11th-ranked UCLA beat 6th ranked SMU -- and UCLA, according to the experts, shouldn't have even been in the tournament in the first place.


There are four regions: South, Midwest, East, and West.

********************************
The President' Bracketology

Link here
SOUTH: Iowa State's loss ruined President Obama's entire South region.  He also got UCLA-SMU wrong. The South was a wipe-out.

WEST: Baylor, upset by Georgia State, also completely ruined President Obama's entire West region.

MIDWEST: inexplicably, the president went with Texas (#11) which was soundly beat by #6 Butler, screwing up his Midwest bracket.

EAST: most yet to be played; the president looks vulnerable here, also.
And this is just the first round.

******************************
A Texas Bust

I could be wrong, but I think all five Texas teams lost in the first round: S. F. Austin (12), Texas Southern (15), Texas (11); Baylor (#3 - not supposed to have happened); and, SMU (#6 - a loss to UCLA -- definitely not supposed to have happened).

5/10 Bakken Wells Coming Off Confidential List Friday Go To DRL Status; Newfield With Two Huge Wells; EOG With A big Well, Fidelity With A Nice Well

Active rigs:


3/19/201503/19/201403/19/201303/19/201203/19/2011
Active Rigs107195185205172

Wells coming off the confidential list Friday --
  • 25292, drl, Whiting, Charging Eagle 10-14-11-2H, Twin Buttes, no production data,
  • 27758, 2,454, EOG, Parshall 72-2127H, Parshall, t9/14; cum 64K 1/15;
  • 28198, drl, SM Energy, Jesse 14X-12H, Poe, no production data,
  • 28213, 342, Fidelity, Deborah 17-20H, Heart River, t10/14; cum 47K 1/15;
  • 28380, drl, XTO, McCoy 44X-23D, Siverston, no production data,28766, 1,562, Newfield, Sand Creek Federal 153-96-21-28-10H, Sand Creek, t1/15 cum 25K 2/15;
    28767, 970, Newfield, Sand Creek Federal 153-96-21-28-2H, Sand Creek, t1/15; cum 29K 2/15;
  • 28973, drl, Petro-Hunt, K. Thorson 159-94-7A-17-2HS, North Tioga, no production data,
  • 29000, drl, CLR, Norfolk 7-1H, North Tobacco Garden, no production data,
  • 29185, 650, Hess, EN-Nelson-155-94-2833H-9, Alkali Creek, t2/15; cum 20K 2/15;
Nine (9) new permits --
  • Operators: Whiting (7),  Sinclair, Armstrong Operating
  • Fields: Mandaree (Dunn), Sanish (Mountrail), Kittleson Slough (Mountrail), Hamlet (wildcat, Divid)
  • Comments: 
One (1) producing well completed:
  • 21963, 4,447, HRC, Fort Berthold 148-95-26A-35-2H, Eagle Nest, Three Forks, originally 1280-acre spacing; changed to 4 sections, no geology report yet to confirm IP; no fracking report; t3/15; cum -- 
**********************************

27758, see above, EOG, Parshall 72-2127H, Parshall:

DateOil RunsMCF Sold
1-201566012497
12-201498238535
11-20142569419823
10-20141016911932
9-2014112073978

28213, see below, Fidelity, Deborah 17-20H, Heart River:

DateOil RunsMCF Sold
1-2015120157443
12-2014140377372
11-201445612611
10-2014103864043
9-201451642252


28766, see above, Newfield, Sand Creek Federal 153-96-21-28-10H, Sand Creek:

DateOil RunsMCF Sold
1-2015224380

28767, see above, Newfield, Sand Creek Federal 153-96-21-28-2H, Sand Creek:

DateOil RunsMCF Sold
1-2015235200
12-201421010

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A Sigh Of Relief

It looks like President Obama won't seek a third term -- there are rumors he or Michelle or both or their pet dog has bought a McMansion in Hawaii. Because that's his ancestral home, mostly likely it was he, not she or it, who bought the McMansion. KITV is reporting:
A well-known Waimanalo home has been sold, but the big question is who is the buyer?


The talk around town points to President Barack Obama, and there is a connection between the president and the buyer of this multi-million dollar estate.

Natural Gas Fill Rate -- March 19, 2015

Natural gas fill rate (a dynamic link): -45.

Again, at the link, scroll to the bottom of the page, and look at the graph (screenshot below).

Bluebirds

Updates

Later, 3:46 p.m.: see original post below. I mentioned that I was going to check my other sources regarding the geographic ranges of the eastern and western bluebirds. I had a stack of books on birds on the book shelf by the door but those books are not there any more. I remember moving them some time ago because they were blocking a photograph of my dad. But now I can't remember where I put that stack of books on birds. I will eventually find them. I'm not so worried about the books, but that's also where I had my winning Powerball lottery ticket worth several million dollars. I remember putting it in one of the books on page 346 because, in millions, that was what the Powerball winnings were. Now I can't find the ticket.
 
And so it goes.
Original Post

I'm trying to get in a 10-mile bike ride/day, six days every week, now that we are starting to see summer in north Texas.

Today on the ride home, I was treated to a wonderful site: a pair eastern bluebirds. According to wiki, western bluebirds are not seen in this area; I will check some other sources later. Mountain bluebirds are seen in this area but these were definitely not mountain bluebirds. So, by elimination (Sherlock Holmes would be proud), these were eastern bluebirds.

My brother Craig introduced me to a pair of eastern bluebirds -- and yes, they were eastern bluebirds -- who nested in the north unit of the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. We would park the car and then hike (on the path) as far back as we could get, and then just before rounding a certain "corner," Craig would say, "okay, you should see them now." It was amazing how predictable they were.

What Could Possibly Go Wrong? -- March 19, 2015

Data for the wells coming off the confidential list today have been posted; quite a mixed bag due to slump in oil prices. Five "Bakken" wells released from the confidential list. The EOG well was huge, with almost 80,000 bbls in the first few months, despite being pretty much shut down in January, probably due to slump in oil prices, but don't know for sure. A Zavanna well is shut-in/inactive. Newfield has a huge well, a Sand Creek Federal, and Whiting has a nice well in Bell oil field down in their Pronghorn prospect. The fifth well, a Statoil Banks oil field well, went to DRL status.

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Iran Limited To 6,000 Centrifuges
Why? Because It's A Nice Round Number ... And That's What Iran Wanted

Yesterday, I wrote this:
Let's see:
  • UN resolution written by US condemning Israel
  • US sanctions on Israel
  • Iran to get nuclear weapons
  • What could possibly go wrong?
That was last night. 

This morning, two headlines:
All we need now to make it a trifecta: a UN resolution backed by the US condemning Israel; that's coming.

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Nothing To Fear But Fear Itself

Kuwait Times reported:
Nothing to fear. With pricing set to start at $349, Apple’s watch will not be playing in the same league as the Swiss watchmakers who dominate the luxury end of the market. The sweet spot for a topend timepiece from Tag Heuer is in the 1,000- 7,000 Swiss franc ($1,070 - $7,500) range, with some models costing [much more].
That was back on September 14, 2014 before Apple announced its "$17,000 and up" Apple watches. LOL.

Today, Tag Heuer announced it will be marketing an Android/Google smart watch.

Tag Heuer's product line will look something like this:




Thursday -- March 19, 2015

Active rigs:


3/19/201503/19/201403/19/201303/19/201203/19/2011
Active Rigs107195185205172

RBN Energy: tectonic changes in the LNG trade.
For years now, the international LNG trade has been based primarily on long-term contracts between buyers and sellers, and those deals have been indexed to oil prices.
That long-standing regime is now tottering, however, and a New World Order that would add considerable flexibility to LNG trading—and increase the role of the LNG spot market—may be in the offing.
That would have huge implications for U.S. natural gas producers who want to export increasing amounts of liquefied gas.
Considering how important a player the U.S. has always been in worldwide energy production and consumption, the country’s experience with the liquefied natural gas (LNG) sector has been limited—at least until now.
Sure, a few LNG import facilities have been in place here for decades. (Distrigas, near Boston, has been operating since 1971, but other early facilities were mothballed in the 1980s or ‘90s before being restarted in the 2000s--just before we realized that the U.S. has far more natural gas underfoot that we had thought.)
But LNG imports peaked in 2007, when they averaged only 2.1 Bcf/d—a drop in the U.S. gas demand bucket.
Now, with lower-48 U.S. gas production averaging more than 70 Bcf/d in 2014 (up from 53 Bcf/d six years earlier) and likely to average 73 or 74 Bcf/d this year, four of those LNG import facilities are being revamped by adding LNG liquefaction facilities (for billions of dollars) so they can export U.S.-sourced gas, with the first (Cheniere Energy’s Sabine Pass) planned to start up before the end of the year.
These first four LNG export projects (most backed by long-term liquefaction tolling agreements, with LNG pricing based on Henry Hub gas) by 2018-19 will liquefy up to 6 Bcf/d of gas from domestic plays; another few export projects under development may boost gas use for export by half (to 9 Bcf/d) by 2020-21. A slew of other LNG export projects are stacked up behind them, but their fate (and the prospects for boosting LNG exports to 12 or 15 Bcf/d by the mid-2020s) may well depend on how the international LNG market—now in considerable turmoil—sorts itself out over the next two or three years.
If any require the president's okay (and at the end of the day, in this "new" environment, they all do), don't hold your breath.

CBR Plummets -- March 19, 2015

Bloomberg is reporting:
Rail shipments of crude and refined products fell last week to the lowest level since October 2013 after a derailment shut a track in Illinois for four days. 
Petroleum shipments by rail have fallen since last summer as plummeting crude prices have caused the biggest slowdown of oil drilling on record. BNSF Railway Co. shut its mainline near the town of Galena, Illinois, from March 5-9 (2015) after a derailment, causing delays and reroutings. 
Last week’s shipments were down 25 percent from the peak of more than 17,000 carloads set the week of December 13, 2014. Petroleum traffic on rail lines more than doubled from 2011 to last year, as booming oil production from North Dakota and Canada overwhelmed pipelines and forced shippers to look for alternative transportation methods.  
BNSF, the largest crude-by-rail shipper in the U.S., shut its mainline after a train carrying 103 cars of crude oil derailed and caught fire. The closing caused delays of up to four days and forced BNSF to reroute some trains, the company said in an online advisory March 8. BNSF can’t say for certain whether the shutdown is the cause of the lower numbers, company spokesman Mike Trevino said by e-mail. 
Traffic on the line is now back to normal, according to BNSF.

No mention of Amtrak in the article. A four-delay for Amtrak in that part of the country is probably the norm.

Unemployment Applications RISE -- Sign That Things Are Improving -- StarTribune -- March 19, 2015; Janet Yellen Moves The Goalposts

I have opined for quite some time that The Los Angeles Times is more liberal than The New York Times, implying that The LA Times is the most liberal "big" newspaper in the US. I keep forgetting about Governor Mark Dayton's newspaper, The StarTribune. I was reminded of that when a reader sent me the link with this headline:
US unemployment benefit applications just slightly up last week, a sign of further job gains. 
Apparently The StarTribune doesn't like "capital letters" in its headlines. But I digress.

Weekly applications for unemployment aid rose slightly by 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 291,000.

The four-week average, a less volatile measure, increased 2,250 to 304,750. That average has dropped 7.5 percent over the past year.

I have trouble writing the word "liberal." I don't have trouble with "liberalism" per se -- in fact, that's what I think the whole US revolution against the British was about. I have trouble with outright lying. Or putting spin into headlines of news stories.

Anyway, whatever. Jobless applications rose last week, and the four-week is well over 300,000 now. The latter number is the Yellen number -- below that number and she will consider raising rates based on other data; above that number, no rate increase.

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Goal Posts Moved

In the meantime, Janet Yellen has moved the goalposts. TheAP/Yahoo!Finance is reporting:
The Federal Reserve was in a tough spot: The February U.S. unemployment rate of 5.5 percent is right where the Fed had been saying inflation would likely start to accelerate. Yet inflation remains even lower than the Fed wants it to be.
So on Wednesday, the Fed simply moved the goalposts.
It now says unemployment could fall as low as 5 percent to 5.2 percent before inflation pressures would probably start to build. That's down from its previous range of 5.2 percent to 5.5 percent.
That shift is a big reason many analysts think the Fed has in effect postponed the date when it will start raising the short-term interest rate it controls. Many now expect it to start raising rates in September or even later after having previously predicted June.
The problem is not the 5.5% rate. The problem is that the unemployment rate is bogus to begin with. No one believes this number. 

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Cowboyistan

On another note, Carpe Diem posted:
Based on today’s BLS report on state employment for January, there have been more than six jobs created in what Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm calls “Cowboyistan” (Texas and North Dakota) since December 2007 for every one job created in the other 48 states and the District of Columbia: more than 1.65M jobs in “Cowboyistan” vs. fewer than 272,000 jobs elsewhere in the country.

NIMBY -- March 19, 2015

The Dickinson Press is reporting:
Dickinson Wind LLC, a subsidiary of Wilton, Conn.-based NextEra Energy Resources LLC, has asked the North Dakota Public Service Commission to approve up to 87 wind turbines west of Highway 8, with Interstate 94 bisecting the area.
The project will produce 150 megawatts that Basin Electric Power Cooperative has agreed to purchase. Dickinson Wind also plans to build a 31-mile, 230-kilovolt overhead transmission line to connect the project to the Belfield-to-Rhame transmission line approximately 10 miles southwest of Dickinson. It would then transmit power into Basin Electric’s transmission system. The project will produce enough energy to power 37,500 homes, according to NextEra Energy.
No price estimate for the project was provided.
Though it would be its first project in Stark County, this isn’t NextEra Energy’s first wind project in North Dakota. The company has approximately 550 wind turbines producing 850 megawatts of energy in seven counties.
“Obviously, North Dakota has a good wind resource,” Stengel said.
Mostly because Connecticut does NOT allow wind turbines in their own state, he might have added.

It's interesting that a Connecticut company is so interested in North Dakota wind. This might be why, from wiki:
Connecticut is the only state in the United States to block the construction of utility scale wind turbines.
Connecticut maintains a renewable portfolio standard that requires 23% of the state's electricity to come from renewable sources by 2020.
Connecticut remains the only state in the United States to disallow the construction of utility-scale wind turbines. The state's two and a half year old ban on wind power was enacted in 2011, ostensibly to provide time for the Siting Council to enact regulations governing the siting of wind turbines in the state.
Those regulations were written in 2012 to address health and safety issues related to wind power, such as maximum noise levels and distances from neighboring properties, but the legislative committee tasked with approving state agency regulations has repeatedly refused to approve the regulations. On November 26, 2013 the Connecticut General Assembly's Regulation Review Committee, for the fourth time since 2012, blocked the Connecticut Siting Council's Regulations that would have ended the state's ban on new wind power projects. The committee, led by co-chairman State Representative Selim Noujaim, forced the Siting Council to withdraw its proposal.
This ban stands in stark contrast to Connecticut’s renewable energy laws requiring utilities to purchase 27% clean electricity (23% renewable) by the year 2020.
The state will no doubt purchase the necessary "clean" electricity from out-of-state, perhaps building a transmission line from Dickinson, North Dakota, to Hartford, Connecticut, via Minnesota and Iowa.

And, of course, Massachusetts defeated an effort to put in Cape Wind off-shore.

NIMBY.